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Taxon  Report  
Setaria verticillata  (L.) P. Beauv.
Hooked bristlegrass
Setaria verticillata is an annual grasslike herb that is not native to California.
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Bloom Period
Genus: Setaria
Family: Poaceae  
Category: angiosperm  
PLANTS group:Monocot
Jepson eFlora section: monocot

Wetlands: Occurs usually in non wetlands, occasionally in wetlands

Habitat: disturbed

Communities: weed, characteristic of disturbed places

Name Status:
Accepted by JEF + PLANTS

Alternate Names:
PLANTSChaetochloa verticillata
PLANTSPanicum verticillatum
Information about  Setaria verticillata from other sources

[Wikipedia] Europe native, Noxious weed, Description: Setaria verticillata is a species of grass known by the common names hooked bristlegrass,[2] rough bristle-grass[3] and bristly foxtail. It is native to Europe, but it is known on most continents as an introduced species and often a noxious weed. It is a hardy bunchgrass which grows in many types of urban, cultivated, and disturbed habitat. It is a weed of many types of agricultural crops, growing in vineyards and fields. Herbicide-resistant strains have been noted.[4] This is an annual grass with decumbent or erect stems growing up to a meter long. The leaf blades are up to 25 centimeters long and have a long sheath around the stem. The inflorescence is a dense panicle up to 15 centimeters long which tapers at both ends. It contains many small spikelets and bristles. The bristles have tiny backwards-pointing barbs that help them hook onto clothing or animal fur, facilitating their dispersal.[4] Seeds of the grass are used to make beer in South Africa and porridge in Namibia.[4] They have been used as a famine food in India.[5] (link added by Mary Ann Machi)


Suggested Citation
Calflora: Information on California plants for education, research and conservation, with data contributed by public and private institutions and individuals. [web application]. 2024. Berkeley, California: The Calflora Database [a non-profit organization]. Available: https://www.calflora.org/   (Accessed: 07/21/2024).